Bosworth Jumbles

My not very elegant S-shapes.

My not very elegant S-shapes.

Welcome back to #TastyTuesday! It’s fortuitous that I stumbled on this recipe this week, as these cookies are alleged to have been King Richard III’s favorite. Richard, of course, is in the news this week, 500 years after his death, because his remains are being interred at Leicester Cathedral tomorrow after the discovery of his bones, two years ago, buried underneath a parking lot.

August 22nd, 1485, was a rather bad day for King Richard. He was fighting a battle at Bosworth field during the War of the Roses, aiming to maintain his family’s hold on the throne (Richard was from the House of York). Unfortunately for him, fate was against him. He dropped his crown and was unable to retrieve it, his cook lost the recipe for his favorite biscuits (cookies)–the Bosworth Jumbles– and later in the day he lost the battle–and his life–to the Earl of Richmond, who became Henry VII.

These cookies are quite simple to make and similar in taste and texture to perhaps a shortbread or American biscuit. I’ve seen recipes that call for the addition of lemon zest or almond flavoring, and I think they might benefit from the addition of a teaspoon of vanilla. Today, however, I made them just the way the cookbook told me to, though in Googling examples of Bosworth Jumbles I found far more elegantly made S-shapes than mine.

Bosworth Jumbles
Makes 12-15

6 ounces/.75 cups butter
1.25 ounces/25 grams sugar
2 eggs
2.25 cups/250 grams flour

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F/180°C.

2. Cream together the butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in the eggs. Add the flour and mix well. The mixture will be thick and crumbly.

3. Shape the dough into small S shapes and place on a greased baking tray. Bake for 15-20 minutes or until they are golden brown.

Tasty Tuesdays on HonestMum.com

3 thoughts on “Bosworth Jumbles

    1. Ginny Williams Post author

      It’s kind of like those old family recipes passed down for generations, isn’t it? Though a few of those traditional recipes with a history I’d rather not eat!

      Reply

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